Archive for October 2010

Facebook and the Silver Screen

October 1, 2010

Social Networking sites are blowing up. Twitter has rolled out its “New Twitter” which makes the Twitter interface even easier than it already is, and Facebook has adopted Skype so that you are connected to everyone on your Friends list by video and SMS at the click of your mouse. Our relationships have become digital.

Facebook has hit the big screen. With movies like The Social Network and Catfish, Facebook is more popular than ever. People have begun defining these movies as “the movies that define our generation.” It makes you wonder, does social networking define our generation? We are ultra-connected to everyone via the internet and our smart phones. Facebook is such a powerful tool that it is even influencing the silver screen, with Oscar buzz about each of these movies. So we ask: what makes these movies so universally accepted among the Tweeps of America?

"Don't Let Anyone Tell You What It Is"

Catfish: “Don’t Let Anyone Tell You What It Is”

With a guerilla marketing campaign that intrigues those who love stories of horror and romance, we are completely left in the dark with what this movie is about. What we know is that this movie hits home to a lot of people. In this digital age with online dating and Facebook “friends” that you meet, talk for an hour, and add on Facebook, the internet is the easiest (and most popular) way to meet someone and to fall in love.

The movie is filmed in a home-video-like way. It seems like it’s just a buddy and his friends goofing around trying to find a hot girl. It looks into his obsession with this girl that he meets on Facebook. The main character is a photographer who’s photo was reproduced in a painting by an 8 yr old girl who’s sister he falls in love with–although he never meets her. The previews show him chatting with her, exchanging pictures, photoshopping pictures of the two of them together, and building a seemingly meaningful relationship. He decides to go to her hometown and find her. We are left wondering if this film is a horror film, a romantic escapade, or a comedy. We cannot tell…but maybe that’s the intrigue?

Catfish has been hailed as a “must-see-film.” It shows insight into online and social networking relationships that seem real, even though human contact is never made. This can be related to by anyone of our generation whether they have participated in online chat room flirting, digital worlds (like World of Warcraft, etc.), Twitter, or even friending and chatting with people on Facebook that you don’t know. People have built relationships in this generation off of medias that previous generations would frown upon or discount. Catfish gives a more human side to the digital age. If you are a Facebook fanatic or have had any sort of online relationship (without ever meeting the person in person), this movie is for you. You will find something completely unexpected.

"You don't get to 500 million friends without making a few enemies."

"You don't get to 500 million friends without making a few enemies."

The Social Network: “You Don’t Get to 500 Million Friends Without Making a Few Enemies”

The Social Network is the movie to see. It traces the story of Mark Zukerberg and his journey to fame and fortune through making Facebook. Zukerberg supposedly is opposed to the raw truth this movie exposes like his law suit, him betraying his friends and the development of Facebook. It poses the question: do the ends justify the means?

Facebook defines who we are today. Not only do people use it to keep tabs on others, but also it has become the main form of communication for practically everyone. Mothers, fathers, grandmothers and distant cousins are reunited due to Facebook.

The Social Network gives insight into how Facebook was created, and in turn how the first decade of the millennium has been defined. Plus, the obvious irony that an anti-social nerd created the most popular social networking site ever is social commentary in itself.  Facebook has revolutionized the internet and how society interacts.